REPORT ABUSE

How to Make a Report to CSB:

The Trumbull County Children Services emergency hotline has someone available to speak with you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including holidays.

What information should I provide?

When you call in to report a concern about a child being abused or neglected, you will speak to a screener who will ask you questions about your concerns. Some important information includes:

  • Name, age, and address of child or children
  • Name and address of custodian/guardian
  • Nature and extent of your concerns
The more information you can provide, the better able we are to assess the situation. Specific information regarding the nature of the harm to the child is very helpful. Once you have made a referral, if you observe continuing concerns please call again to report additional information. Your reports are confidential. Your name will not be revealed.

How to Recognize Abuse or Neglect:

Abuse is the physical or psychological maltreatment of a child. It is an action, or lack of action, which endangers a child’s physical, psychological or emotional health and development. Abuse can be physical, sexual or emotional. Some indicators of physical, sexual and emotional abuse are: unexplained bruising, burns or injuries, shyness or antisocial behavior, sudden changes in behavior, drastic weight loss or gain, poor school attendance, complaints of genital pain, pregnancy, poor social relationships and self-isolation.
Neglect is a failure to act on a child’s behalf. It may not produce visible signs, and it usually occurs over time. Neglect can be physical, emotional or educational. Indicators of neglect could be chronic hunger, tiredness, child appearing malnourished, untreated illness or injury, a lack of housing or items to meet the child’s basic needs.

FAQ's

Who should report abuse or neglect? Anyone who suspects a child has been maltreated or is at risk of abuse or neglect is encouraged to make a report. This includes family, friends and neighbors. Professionals who work with children, such as teachers, police and medical practitioners are mandated reporters and are required to report any suspicions of abuse and neglect of a child. If you are a mandated reporter and want training for you and/or your staff on how to recognize and report abuse, please contact Nancy Boley at (330) 372-2010.

Will the Children be removed from the home? We do everything we can to keep families together whenever possible. When parents cannot provide a safe home for their children, we first look for relatives or friends for help. Placement outside of the family is considered a last resort. We are strength-based and family-centered. We look for the positive attributes that have made a family work. We build on these attributes so families can recover from a crisis and grow stronger. Strong families make it possible for children to live in a safe home where they can grow up healthy and happy.

How is Children Services funded? Most of our programs are made possible thanks to generous community support from our local operating levy. Other funding comes from state and federal sources.

What is the Ohio Safe Haven Law? A birth parent can leave a newborn baby, up to 30 days old, with a medical worker in a hospital, a medical worker at a fire department or other emergency service organization, or law enforcement agency. If the infant has suffered no abuse or neglect, Ohio law provides protection from prosecution for surrendering the child. No one ever has to abandon a child ever again. Call the Confidential Toll Free Hotline 1-888-510-BABY or Visit Baby Safe Haven for more information. If the Safe Haven Law does not apply to your situation or you need information regarding adoption options or surrendering your child, please call our 24 hour hotline.

Normal Business Hours:
 Monday - Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Emergency Hotline is available at ALL other times - (330) 372-2010